Exit Standards for other courses in the Dept. of Psychhology -all of which are used in accordance with the Dept's SLOs.

Psychhology 103: 

  1. Students will be able to define physiological psychology and identify the major goals of the physiological psychologist.
  2. Students will be able to evaluate the relationship between the mind and body with emphasis on the traditional approaches to physiological psychology.
  3. Students will be able to describe the traditional approaches to physiological psychology.
  4. Students will be able to distinguish between cause and effect relationships and correlations in physiological psychology experiments.
  5. Students will be able to identify and discuss the structures and functions of the nervous system and their psychological concomitants.

Psychhology 104: 

  1. Students will be able to define social psychology.
  2. Students will be able to discuss the traditional psychological approaches used in the study of social behavior.
  3. Students will be able to distinguish between cause and effect relationships and correlation in social psychology.
  4. Students will be able to describe and analyze social psychological theories in individual social behavior, interpersonal social behavior, and social behavior in groups.

Psychhology 105: 

  1. Students will be able to use appropriate vocabulary for the discussion of sexuality.
  2. Students will be able to describe the physiological, psychological, and cultural aspects of sexual expression.
  3. Students will be able to use the information in responsible decision-making regarding the expression of sexuality.
  4. Students will be able to explain the historical development of our cultural attitudes toward sexual expression.
  5. Students will be able to evaluate the current, and often conflicting, cultural standards of sexual behavior.

Psychhology 106: 

  1. Students will be able to describe the history of and traditional approaches to the study of developmental psychology.
  2. Students will be able to discuss the developmental changes that take place across the human life-span.
  3. Students will be able to discuss the nature versus nurture controversy as it applies to developmental psychology.
  4. Students will be able to describe research methodology in developmental psychology.
  5. Students will be able to evaluate the differences between cause and effect relationships and correlations.
  6. Students will be able to analyze the interaction of cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development across the human life-span.

Psychhology 108: 

  1. Students will be able to recognize and make appropriate use of specific terminology relevant to course content.
  2. Students will be able to recognize and relate cross-cultural and historical factors influencing the response to loss events.
  3. Students will be able to understand the emotional, economic, and physical impact of serious loss events as presented by such observers as Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, Edwin Schneidman, and Bertha Simos.
  4. Students will be able to understand and develop coping methods for dealing with the impact of serious losses.
  5. Students will be able to apply knowledge and understanding toward more effectively assisting and supporting others in the process of recovery from serious losses.

Psychhology 109: 

  1. Students will be able to assess fallacious stereotypes concerning the aging process and the aged as a group.
  2. Students will be able to describe and assess special talents and needs of the aging population.
  3. Students will be able to demonstrate positive attitudes towards the aged in general and their own aging.
  4. Students will be able to describe and evaluate selected trends in research and theory.
  5. Students will be able to define biological aging, physiological aging, and psychological aging using current theories and clinical findings.
  6. Students will be able to discuss the implications of an aging population for social institutions.

Psychhology 110: 

  1. Students will be able to deal more effectively with the stresses of living.
  2. Students will be able to assess and order important values and make life decisions that are consistent with these important values.
  3. Students will be able to manage interpersonal relationships in family, friendship, and work situations.
  4. Students will be able to determine more effective ways to resolve problems and conflicts of daily living.
  5. Students will be able to identify and discuss major psychological concepts and theories regarding the basic issues of human nature.

Psychhology 111: 

  1. Students will be able to compare and contrast Western industrialized and non-western and pre-industrialized models of health, disease, and healing.
  2. Students will be able to discuss historical perspectives of women's health care and its effect on their psychological health.
  3. Students will be able to analyze women as medical and psychological research subjects.
  4. Students will be able to identify the processes of menstruation, pregnancy, or menopause and relate these uniquely female bodily functions to the overall health of women.
  5. Students will be able to analyze current research findings on women and HIV, AIDS, sexually transmitted diseases, cancer, depression, cardiovascular diseases, eating disorders, addiction, and domestic violence.

Psychhology 113: 

  1. Students will be able to identify, compare, and contrast the major theoretical perspectives of the psychology of women.
  2. Students will be able to discuss the historical perspective of traditional and nontraditional roles of women.
  3. Students will be able to define myth, stereotype, gender differences, and gender role and assess the effects each has had on women.
  4. Students will be able to identify the theoretical views and misconceptions of women of color, lesbian women, and bisexual women and analyze each citing research results.
  5. Students will be able to describe the changes which occur in female development across the life-span.
  6. Students will be able to relate women's writings to the need for creative expression, communication, safety, and relevance building.
  7. Students will be able to distinguish fact from opinion or belief about female sexuality and biological development.

Psychhology 114: 

  1. Students will be able to understand and apply modern psychological theories of interpersonal communication.
  2. Students will be able to identify and accurately label a minimum of three styles of interpersonal communication and understand the appropriate use of each.
  3. Students will be able to understand the psychological and cultural sources of interpersonal conflicts and act effectively toward their resolutions.
  4. Students will be able to identify and respond to the components of intrapsychic and interpersonal crisis.
  5. Students will be able to identify psychological factors that limit communication ability.
  6. Students will be able to apply learned skills to develop more effective communication skills in the home, the work place, and in society at large.

Psychhology 115: 

  1. Students will be able to describe the issues involved in defining abnormal behavior.
  2. Students will be able to describe the history of abnormal psychology and models of abnormal/maladaptive behavior.
  3. Students will be able to identify methods of assessing and diagnosing psychopathological behavior.
  4. Students will be able to describe patterns and suspected causes of abnormal behaviors with an emphasis on the interaction of biological, psychosocial, and sociocultural factors.
  5. Students will be able to describe the treatment and management of psychological/mental disorders.

Psychhology 131: 

  1. Students will be able to describe and assess changing marital, partnership, and family roles from prehistorical and historical perspectives.
  2. Students will be able to describe and assess reasons why people might elect to live married or single lifestyles today.
  3. Students will be able to identify and assess styles of relating, including conflict management.
  4. Students will be able to identify major factors that have contributed to changes in expectations related to marriage and family and to changing lifestyles.
  5. Students will be able to describe different child-rearing philosophies and their techniques.
  6. Students will be able to summarize the unique characteristics of gay and lesbian relationships.

Psychhology 150: 

  1. Students will be able to define psychology as a science.
  2. Students will be able to describe the major schools of psychology and discuss the role each has played in education.
  3. Students will be able to analyze student characteristics and needs using principles of psychology.
  4. Students will be able to compare and contrast behaviorist learning theory, constructivism, and cognitive psychology.
  5. Students will be able to evaluate theories of teaching and learning.
  6. Students will be able to discuss the relationship between the history of psychometrics and current trends in assessment.
  7. Students will be able to apply principles of psychology to the classroom.
Last updated: 2/12/2009 3:48:03 PM